Free resources for at-risk military veterans

3/17/2017

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According the Department of Veterans Affairs, roughly 20 veterans a day commit suicide nationwide. The VA study also shows approximately 70% of military veterans who took their own lives were not regular users of VA services that might have helped them.

If you know an at-risk veteran, please learn more about the free resources available to them and you. No one wants our veterans who have served their country heroically to become tragic statistics here at home.

Veterans Crisis Line: The Veterans Crisis Line connects veterans in crisis, their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24/7 every day of the year including holidays. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is also available.

MakeTheConnection.net: This VA-sponsored website connects veterans, their friends and family with helpful resources for improving their health, well-being, and everyday life. Watch inspiring true story videos. Learn what’s worked for other vets. Discover positive steps you can take—all offered in the words of fellow veterans of the US Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard.

Coaching Into Care: This VA national phone service 888-823-7458 provides education, support, and empowerment for family members and friends seeking care or services for a veteran. It helps you find appropriate resources at local VA facilities and in your community. The service also provides coaching for family and friends of veterans having difficulty adjusting to civilian life. Coaching is provided free-of-charge by a licensed psychologist or social worker. Calls are confidential.

Among the non-VA programs available to at-risk vets is one focused on empowering disabled vets—including quadruple amputees—by restoring their hope and purpose through adaptive physical training.

Adaptive Training Foundation: NFL veteran David Vobora met US Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills, a quadruple amputee, in 2014. Owner/head trainer of a for-profit gym for elite athletes, Vobora offered his expertise to Mills. In the process of customizing and adapting a performance training program for Mills, Vobora developed a passion for helping veterans and others with life-altering injuries. Today, the Adaptive Training Foundation empowers disabled athletes by restoring their hope through movement and redefining their physical limitations through success--especially at-risk veterans. Adaptive training is provided at no charge. Watch A Warrior’s Workout.

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